Boston – Faneuil Hall Quincy Market

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Gallery Keywords: Adams, Architecture, Boston, Brick, Building, City, Colonial, Downtown, England, Faneuil, Faneuil Hall, Government, Hall, House, Independence, Liberty, Market, Marketplace, Meeting, People, Quincy, Quincy Market, Revolutionary, Sam, Samuel, Shop, Shopping, Sightseeing, Square, Statue, Store, Tourism, Tourist, Mayor, Kevin White, Michael Curley

 

Description: “Faneuil Hall located near the waterfront and today’s Government Center, in Boston, Massachusetts, has been a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1743. It was the site of several speeches by Samuel Adams, James Otis, and others encouraging independence from Great Britain. Now it is part of Boston National Historical Park and a well-known stop on the Freedom Trail. It is sometimes referred to as “the Cradle of Liberty”.  Quincy Market is a historic building near Faneuil Hall in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. It was constructed 1824 1826 and named in honor of Mayor Josiah Quincy, who organized its construction without any tax or debt. The main Quincy Market building continues to be a source of food for Bostonians, though it has changed from grocery to food-stall, fast-food, and restaurants. It is a popular and busy lunchtime spot for downtown workers. In the center, surrounding the dome, is a two-story seating area. Further street vending space is available against the outside walls of the building, especially on the south side, under a glass enclosure. Most stalls in this space sell trinkets, gifts, and other curiosities. A few restaurants also occupy fully enclosed spaces at the ends of this enclosure.”  [Text from Wikipedia]

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